Most Popular Sports Around The World

All types of sports are popular globally, but what sports can we call THE most popular in the world? Some of the answers may surprise you.

It’s no surprise that football, or what Americans call “soccer” is the world’s most popular sport to play and to watch. An estimated 3.5 billion people either watch or play football. The World Cup is the global championship of the sport and this tournament is played every four years. The World Cup itself is one of the highest rated sports on television, with many countries tuning in en masse to watch their country’s team play. Football is popular in all of the UK, Europe, Asia as well as South America. However, with so many other sports being popular, the Unites States still lags behind in their interest in “soccer”.

Next, we have cricket. This sport which consists of a bat and a ball, has been around for hundreds of years and originated in England. The sport is popular in the UK, Australia, New Zealand, some African countries, some Caribbean countries and it is the most popular sport in the countries of India and Pakistan. An estimated 3 billion people watch or play cricket each year.

The next most popular sport is a sure surprise, and that is field hockey, with an estimated 2 billion players or watchers, mostly in Asian countries, European countries, Australia and around Africa. This sport tends to be played in high schools in the United States, usually by girls only.

Coming up next is tennis. Not so surprising, but there are an estimated 1 billion players and watchers of tennis around the world. Tennis tends to be popular in richer countries, including the United States, Asian countries, Australia and Europe. There are four main tournaments in tennis, called “Grand Slams” at which players from many countries play. The first is the Australian Open, then the French Open, Wimbledon and then the US Open in late August. The Grand Slam tournaments tend to get the most attention during the tennis season.

Next we have volleyball. Yet another surprise, with an estimated 900 million viewers or players around the world. Volleyball is popular in the United States, where the sport originated, as well as in Brazil, all over Europe, Russia, China and Japan. Volleyball is a popular high school sport in many countries due to it’s team centered play and lack of specialized equipment requirements.

Also popular is table tennis, otherwise known as Ping Pong. This is another surprisingly popular sport around the world, with an estimated 900 million watchers or players. Table tennis originated in England as an after dinner activity for Victorians in the late 19th century. Table tennis as a competitive sport is popular in many countries but is especially popular in China, Korea and Singapore.

After these sports, we have a triumvirate of more mainstream American sports including baseball, golf, American football and basketball, with each sport attracting between 400 and 500 million players or watchers worldwide.

Hard Thick Toenails Treatment – Prevention and Causes

Thick toenails are often the result of a toenail fungus. In some cases however toenails can thicken due to wearing tight shoes.

Some of the symptoms of toenail fungus include thickening of the nail, discoloration of the nail, brittleness resulting in crumbling, fogging of the nail, and spots. You may also smell a slight stench coming from under the nail. Often but not always you may feel a slight pain while putting weight on the infected toe.

Causes

Fungus can be caused by a few different things. Its important to understand the causes of toenail fungal infection in order to prevent it from coming back.

Moist public areas such as public pools, gyms, and locker rooms are the perfect breeding ground for fungus and can easily be spread. Make sure you always wear sandals around these places whenever possible. This will significantly reduce your risks.

Also important is to always make sure your shoes have dried out since your last use. Never wear sweaty sneakers left from yesterday. Equally important in preventing thickening of the nails and toenail fungus is making sure your shoes aren’t too tight fitting. Try to wear moisture absorbent socks. This will take moisture of the toes and decrease risks.

Treatments

In addition to taking good preventative measures you’ll need a remedy to treat your current fungus. Most treatments by themselves are ineffective. Prescription drugs that are ingested are dangerous and should be avoided. Not only do they attempt to treat your fungus but they also do serious damage to your liver and kidneys. In extreme cases this can result in liver failure resulting in death.

The best method I found for treating toenail fungus was by soaking my nails in hot water and then gently removing a thin layer of my infected nail with a file. I then applied a white vinegar and dark beer soak for about 30 minutes per treatment twice a day. After this I applied a natural treatment.

What Does Reverse Osmosis Do – What is It?

What does reverse osmosis do? This is a question that we've been hearing a lot laTely. A better question would be, what is reverse osmosis good for. The answer to the second question is, not much. We'll explain why as we move along.

What does reverse osmosis do for you to provide you with clean drinking water? It is basically a de-mineralization system used by the water treatment facilities to filter out larger or see contaminants in the drinking water system. It works by using a porous or a ceramic filter to trap contaminants which have a greater molecular weight than the water itself. It will not however block anything of equal or less weight than the water.

So, what is reverse osmosis doing about all of the chemicals, microbes, and spores in our dinking water? How is it protecting us from them? The truth is that it's not designed in such a way as to do anything about them, and without the use of further filtering it's doing absolutely nothing to protect you.

When answering the question what does reverse osmosis do, we can not be completely negative. The system actually has many positive uses when it comes to industrial purposes. De-mineralization is a necessity in many field such as car washing and photo developing. Here it does an efficient and wonderful job.

What is reverse osmosis doing for your health and well being though? Not much at all we're afraid. As you may or may not be aware there are over 50,000 chemicals in use today, any of which can be found in your drinking water at any time. Chlorine, another toxin, is used to disenfect the water, but there are limits to it's effectiveness. Many forms of microscopic bacteria are imperfect to chlorine, and can cause serious gastric distress if ingested.

What does reverse osmosis do to prevent these microbes from reaching your tap? If you answered not a thing, then your catching on. The funny thing is that the very chemical used to disenfect the water does itself leave behind a microbial byproduct. As the chlorine passes, tiny spores are formed which also escape the filters grass.

Some of you may have seen advertising in recent months for rverse osmosis for your home. The ads go on about how their system is the ideal way to protect and purify your familys' drinking water. Do not believe the hype. As we've already shown you, it is an ill effective means of protection. I t really really kind of a silly concept anyway. If the water treatment plant can not decontaminate your water using the system, then what is reverse osmosis for your home going to do?

What you need to do is shop around for a high quality home system featuring an activated carbon filter. There are many different models available, and you can purchase them as individual tap units, or as whole house models.

Now, if anyone should ever ask for you, what does reverse osmosis do? You'll know to tell them, not much.

The Biggest Challenge For Cloud Computing In 2012

Cloud computing has become quite the buzzword in the IT world. Whether you prefer to use the term cloud services, cloud hosting, cloud computing, or whatever … you need to be aware of the challenges and what you're getting into before you jump right into it.

Security always appears top of the list, coupled with what I interpret as confusion over how and what is needed to make best use of the cloud. So in short, for me, a lack of understanding remains the challenge. Whilst security is critical, I feel the need to provide some counter points.

Any computer connected to the Internet is at risk from hackers, whether it is in the cloud or in a private data center. Would it be true to say that an SME, with necessarily limited resources, is able to better secure its data than say Amazon? In addition, who says everything needs to be in the cloud? Adopting a cloud computing strategy is not an 'all or nothing' decision. Data can remain within a data center or on promise, while applications that need to access such data can be based in the cloud. That's the whole principle behind the different cloud types – private, public or hybrid.

I think that anyone considering a move to the cloud needs to carefully consider their motivations and objectives for doing so, and to question what data and workflows they and their customers will feel happy placing in the cloud. Most importantly, select a vendor that can accommodate your cloud migration strategy, now and in the future. The challenge in 2012 is not that of cloud computing, the challenge for cloud vendors or providers of Cloud 'services' is that they need to not only promote the benefits of their particular offering, but also educate the market on the benefits of cloud, full stop.

Another major challenge will be Bandwidth. It's probably the case that the majority of SME / Bs have 'plenty' of local network bandwidth with which to conduct their in-house operations / business, however, it's also probably the case that in their pipe (s) into the 'Cloud' and that could be an awkward bottleneck if you swallowed the cloud philosophy without adequate preparation – which, of course, you'd never do.

For the pessimists amongst you, please see Moore's Law and Nielson's Law, there's always Parkinson's Law, which reads: "Usage expends so as to fill all available bandwidth."